Killer’s appeal thrown out: Man who murdered ex-girlfriend’s father is told he will serve full sentence

James Carbott, 31, beat Thomas Baird with a crowbar and stabbed him with a Stanley knife at his bungalow in Highfield, Hemel Hempstead
James Carbott, 31, beat Thomas Baird with a crowbar and stabbed him with a Stanley knife at his bungalow in Highfield, Hemel Hempstead
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A builder who stabbed his ex-girlfriend’s father to death before setting him alight has failed to convince top judges he was not in his right mind at the time of the killing.

A builder who stabbed his ex-girlfriend’s father to death before setting him alight has failed to convince top judges he was not in his right mind at the time of the killing.

James Carbott murdered 63-year-old Thomas Baird outside his home in Westerdale, Hemel Hempstead, in March 2013.

The 31-year-old, of Epping Green in the town, was found guilty of murder and arson at St Albans Crown Court in February last year.

He was jailed for life and ordered to serve at least 27 years behind bars.

Carbott launched a bid to challenge his conviction and minimum jail term at London’s Criminal Appeal Court yesterday, but his complaints were thrown out by three of the country’s most senior judges.

Mr Baird’s body was discovered by firefighters outside his burning bungalow, where he lived alone.

A post-mortem examination revealed he suffered multiple stab wounds, and injuries to his head and body.

Carbott had worked for Mr Baird for three months before he and the victim’s daughter, Kelly split up ‘acrimoniously’.

Tension between Carbott and Mr Baird following the break-up led to the savage killing.

Carbott attacked Mr Baird with a crowbar and knife, before dousing his body in petrol and lighting a fire.

He tried to cover his tracks by torching his clothes and throwing his weapons into a ditch.

The court heard Carbott suffered from anxiety and depression after being the victim of an attack in 2007, and was described as being on the autistic spectrum.

His lawyers argued his responsibility was diminished at the time of the killing and he had suffered ‘temporary loss of control’.

They said his murder conviction should be replaced with a manslaughter verdict, and his jail term was far too long.

But Lord Justice Leveson ruled the conviction ‘safe’ and his punishment ‘not excessive’.
At the time of Carbott’s conviction last year, officers from the Herts, Beds and Cambs Major Crime Unit were praised by the judge for their work on the murder case.”

Det Insp John Arthur from the team said at the time that Carbott’s lengthy sentence reflected the severity of the crime he had committed