Clubs and Community (including the scouts who beat 73 teams to win tough orienteering contest)

From left, Josh Frewin, Alistair Hankey, Oliver Nutkins and Morris Moorhouse formed Icknield Explorer Unit Team B, which beat 73 teams to win the Herts Peak Assault
From left, Josh Frewin, Alistair Hankey, Oliver Nutkins and Morris Moorhouse formed Icknield Explorer Unit Team B, which beat 73 teams to win the Herts Peak Assault

The latest news from clubs and community groups in your area.

Members of Tring’s Icknield Explorer scouts scored top marks during a challenging two-day orienteering contest in mountainous, windswept and rainy conditions.

Eighteen members of the Inner Wheel Club of Berkhamsted Bulbourne enjoyed a walk on a glorious sunny evening in August PNL-141023-215520001

Eighteen members of the Inner Wheel Club of Berkhamsted Bulbourne enjoyed a walk on a glorious sunny evening in August PNL-141023-215520001

They were taking part in the recent Herts Peak Assault, which saw them up against 73 other teams from across Hertfordshire, all based in groups of four to seven members.

The Icknield Explorer unit entered three teams into the contest - and Team B, made up of Josh Frewin, Alistair Hankey, Oliver Nutkins and Morris Moorhouse, won the whole event.

Team A - which included Rob Gray, Jack Winter, Tom Frewin and Anthony Dunford - came in fifth place.

Team C, meanwhile, was entered as a ‘training team’, accompanied by unit leader Paul Terret, and came fourth in that category. Its members were Georgina Gatehouse, Becca Bowman, Eleanor McKerrow.

Geoff Lambert and Buddy, his little dog, spoke to members of the Inner Wheel Club of Berkhamsted Bulbourne about Medical Detection Dogs PNL-141023-215531001

Geoff Lambert and Buddy, his little dog, spoke to members of the Inner Wheel Club of Berkhamsted Bulbourne about Medical Detection Dogs PNL-141023-215531001

Every year Hertfordshire Scouts organise ‘Herts Peak Assault’. This is a two-day competition walking in mountainous terrains, carrying all your own kit, tents, food.

The location is top secret and until they arrive at the base camp, no one knows where the event will be held.

On day one each team receives an envelope with grid references and a map. Each grid reference refers to a checkpoint, each being worth different points depending on how difficult it is to find in terms of height and distance.

The competition is based on an orienteering system, the object being to visit as many checkpoints as possible. On day one you have eight hours and day two you have four.

They camp each night, cook for themselves and navigate through difficult terrain and conditions.

This year the competition was held in the Lake District in extreme weather conditions that saw many tents swept away by wind and non-stop rain.

Leader of the Icknield Scout Unit Paul Terret said: “I’m incredibly proud of what they have all achieved over the weekend.”

The presentation ceremony, normally held on the same day, was postponed until November due to such severe weather conditions.

This will now take place on Monday, November 10, at Hobbs Hill Wood Primary School in Hemel Hempstead.

The Icknield Explorer scouts are based in Longfield Road, Tring.

Brass rubbing explained to ladies of Felden W.I.

A group of ladies from the Felden Women’s Institute experienced an interesting and historical tour of Dacorum’s Old High Street.

This is covered in a new leaflet produced by Dacorum Borough Council and highlights the Heritage Trail dating from the Normans, through the Plantagenets, Tudors and Victorians to the present day.

Felden W.I. spokesman Jill Leon said: “We completed our tour by visiting the lovely traditional tea house in the Old High Street, which was very quaint and a cosy time was had by all.

“Our meeting was on brass rubbing by David Maycock, who gave a very interesting talk and demonstration on the history of church brasses.

“Members then tried the skill for themselves with some excellent rubbings produced. The competition was won by Rosemary Jones for her intricately made horse and cart.

“Our next meeting is on Friday, November 14, at the Blind Centre, 6 Alston Road, at 2.15pm when Richard Selby will give a talk on the history of money.

“Visitors welcome.”

Inner Wheel Club of Berkhamsted Bulbourne

What follows is a report by club correspondent Penny Craddock on the group’s activities between August and October...

‘Eighteen members of the Inner Wheel Club of Berkhamsted Bulbourne enjoyed a walk on a glorious sunny evening in August.

‘We walked through beautiful Chiltern countryside and ended with a delicious supper in a local pub. A wonderful start to our new year.

‘The programme for the forthcoming year looks busy and interesting with speakers on many different subjects, the first of whom was Andrew Searle speaking on Water Aid, our charity for this year.

‘He clearly outlined the urgent need for funds to support an ambitious project to enable access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene for millions of people in the developing world by 2030.

‘Water Aid is our main charity for the year so the talk served to encourage us to raise as much money as possible.

‘The first social event was a guided walk to the First World War training trenches on Berkhamsted Common.

‘On September 28, 1914, troops from the Inns of Court Officer Training Corps, nicknamed The Devil’s Own, arrived in Berkhamsted to train before heading for the battlefields of northern France.

‘We were interested to hear that many familiar sights had been used as quarter masters stores, a parade ground and a site for 300 tents.

‘It was a most interesting walk and our guide Brian Shepherd gave us numerous facts and even burst into song!

‘It was a most appropriate event during the centenary year of the First World War. The walk is marked and some of the trenches are clearly visible.

‘We welcomed Geoff Lambert and Buddy, his little dog, to our club in October to speak on Medical Detection Dogs: a fascinating subject where dogs are trained to detect various illnesses such as certain cancers and diabetes.

‘Many people have benefitted from dogs trained to detect changes in an individual with unstable diabetes.

‘Geoff Lambert said: “Not one person with a trained dog has collapsed as the dogs are able to recognize changes in blood sugar levels.”

‘The dogs have enabled people to lead more full and active lives. Fifteen dogs are trained per year at a cost of £11,000 per dog.

‘Along with the social and fundraising events and Rotary joint meetings we have a very busy year ahead of us.

‘The enthusiastic support of the club members ensures the club goes from strength to strength and our numbers continue to grow.’

> For more Clubs and Community pictures, visit our website on Sunday, when this page of the paper will be published online.