We wonder who tested the birthday cake!

Motorcycle helmet tests were among the earliest carried out by BSI in Hemel Hempstead  picture � BSI
Motorcycle helmet tests were among the earliest carried out by BSI in Hemel Hempstead picture � BSI

AN organisation with very good standards has marked its 60th anniversary.

The British Standards Institution (BSI), based in Maylands Avenue, Hemel Hempstead, has been bashing, squashing and stretching products since 1951.

Early tasks included defining the optimum vest length, safe use of pressure cookers and effectiveness of motorcycle helmets.

First registered in 1903, the BSI Kitemark is the UK’s symbol for quality, reassurance and trust.

Since the 1950s the Women’s Advisory Committee has evolved into the BSI Consumer and Public Interest Network, which is currently chaired by consumer watchdog Lynn Faulds Wood.

The network’s focus is to encourage consumer contributions into the standards development process to add a balanced, impartial view and help to produce standards which reflect more accurately the needs and desires of the entire marketplace.

The BSI is marking the occasion with a drive to increase the British public’s contribution to the development of new standards.

Anne Ferguson, manager for consumer and public interest standardisation at BSI, said standards cover items from garden tools to baby buggies.